Using Native Planting to Encourage Wildlife

By Geoff Wakeling Platinum Quality Author

If you are planning on creating a wildlife garden, one of the best planting options is to include native species. At the very least you should attempt to include a range of ornamental strains developed from native specimens. Plants which are naturally growing in a region will often thrive in gardens as they are already adapted to the environment in which they are growing. This therefore means that they require less work to maintain, in addition to providing insects, birds, mammals and other creatures with a natural transition from wild habitat to carefully managed garden.

There a number of ways for including native planting in your garden depending on the space that you aspire to have. If you don’t mind having a slightly wild area, let nature take its course and as plants self seed themselves allow them to grow. This could be a small area of meadow which is allowed to thrive, a patch of nettles in a corner, or the sporadic growing of plants throughout a border. Plants such as borridge and forget-me-nots can look very pretty before going over, and can fit into a border quite well. Weeds are all in a gardeners perception, and are simply plants which have grown, in your mind, in the wrong place. Allowing the odd ‘weed’ to grow can be beneficial for wildlife, especially insects that will naturally be drawn to native plants that they visit every day. Leaving a wild patch of native planting is ideally the best way to encourage wildlife into your garden, and if you have room it is the best option.

If you prefer to garden through a more maintained method and do not want to incorporate a wild patch of naturally growing vegetation in your garden, the best option is to try and include ornamental varieties of wild plants. In some cases this can actually be more beneficial to wildlife, with some propagated specimens having larger flowers and more nectar for creatures to feast upon. All plants have fundamentally been bred from naturally occurring specimens, so finding species native to your area should not be hard. Foxgloves, ornamental nettles, roses, and thornless blackberries are all examples of plants which have been developed into ornamental plants and are commonly used in gardens around the world even though some may look far removed from their native counterparts. However, their use in wildlife gardens will provide the ideal transition as creatures move from a natural habitat to a managed one. Meanwhile, by utilising plants which are native to your area, you can help ensure that gardens will thrive in their environment, taking less time to maintain, and providing wildlife with a welcome home from home.

If you want to learn more about becoming a green fingered horticulturist and enjoying your own garden and allotment head over to http://www.theguidetogaygardening.com for more information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Geoff_Wakeling

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