Category Archives: Urban Gardens

Ratibida Pinnata : Yellow Coneflower

Product Description:
“Drooping Coneflower, Gray Coneflower, Prairie Coneflower (also applied to R. columnifera), Weary Susan, Grayheaded Coneflower”

Origin of the name Ratibida is not known. Pinnata comes from the Latin word meaning “featherlike

Sun Exposer: Prairie, Savanna
Soil Moisture: Mesic, Dry Mesic
Bloom Time: Summer, Fall (July, August, September)
Bloom Color: Yellow
Max Height: 5 Feet
Wetland Code: UPL
Germ Code: C(30)
Seeds Per Ounce: 30,000

Found throughout the Tallgrass Prairie region and extensively elsewhere. Prefers dry areas, roadsides, along old railroad right-of-ways. Root system is a very stout, sturdy rhizome. One or several yellow flowers may top a single stem. Grows tall and erect to about 4 feet. Grows easily from seed and is often found as a sturdy and plentiful survivor on former prairies where nearly all of the original plants have disappeared.

Native Americans made a refreshing tea from the cones and leaves of yellow coneflower. The Meskwaki used the root as an ingredient to cure toothaches.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Usse: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To Purchase This Native Wildflower Click on Ion Exchange, Inc., Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/RATIBIDA-PINNATA-%7C-Yellow-Coneflower.html

 

 

 

The Great Sunflower Project Article On The BUZZ: Join Us for the Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11, 2012

The BUZZ: Join Us for the Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11!

Greetings citizen scientists! Our poll results are in, and, at last count, some 46% of you have sunflowers up and blooming. About one-third (34%) are still waiting for blooms (or encountered an gardening mishap), and another 21% didn’t plant sunflowers this year.

Those of you lucky enough to have sunflowers in bloom are diligently sending in your bee observations. Congratulations to all those who have already had the opportunity to observe, collect and report their data. Well done! Without your thoughtful observations, we would not have the wealth of information that we have to date.

To see results from the project using data reported up to 2012, have a look here: http://www.greatsunflower.org/results#map – you can zoom in on your area, see averages by type of garden and trends by year. Great stuff, and all because of your participation!

It’s important that you keep sending in data, so please join us and thousands of others across the country in The Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11th.

Even if you do not have blooms on your sunflowers by August 11th, you can still be enjoy, learn and be part of the project by observing bees on other plants that you may have in bloom. Cosmos, tickseed, bee balm and echinacea, are all on our list, so you can collect data on these if your sunflowers are not blooming yet. And, it’s okay if your sunflower hasn’t bloomed yet. They will in time so you can make your 15 minute observation when they do open up.

And, this year, in support of the Great Bee Count, YourGardenShow.com will present a special online live broadcast “Double Feature” on August 11th, from 10am – noon EST (7am to 9am PST). First hour: a special “Ask Ian” Q&A show about pollination and pollinators followed by an hour of moderated interviews with bee experts talking about our pollinator friends. Join us for this one day event!: http://www.yourgardenshow.com/ask-ian

As you can see from our map, bees are declining in certain areas, and there are some areas where we have no data. Could that be your garden? The more we know, the more action will be able to be taken to preserve and enhance pollinator habitat.

Join us on August 11th!

Freddy B

To Purchase Pollinator Seed Mix Click on Ion Exchange, Inc. Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/POLLINATOR-MIX.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Wild Geranium – Geranium maculatum Harvest at Ion Exchange, Inc.

Earthyman harvests Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum) for Ion Exchange, native prairie seed and plant nursery in NE Iowa.

To Purchase Geranium Maculatum | Wild Geranium Visit Our Website Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/GERANIUM-MACULATUM-%7C-Wild-Geranium.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Ion Exchange, Inc.

1878 Old Mission Dr.

Harpers Ferry, IA 52146-7533

Earthyman Walks the Woodland Edge at Ion Exchange, Inc.

Earthyman walks the Woodland Edge at Ion Exchange, native seed and plant nursery in NE Iowa http://www.ionxchange.com What beautiful wildflowers can you add to your woodland edge?

http://ionxchange.com/

Planting Butterfly Milkweed Plugs at Ion Exchange

Earthyman supervises planting Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) plugs at Ion Exchange, Inc, native seed and plant nursery in NE Iowa.

To purchase Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) Click on Our Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/ASCLEPIAS-TUBEROSA-%7C-Butterfly-Milkweed.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Ion Exchange Inc., A Native Seed & Plant Nursery Was Quoted In The Wall Street Journal

Howard Bright co-owner with his wife Donna of Ion Exchange, Inc. http://ionxchange.com/  was recently quoted in The Wall Street Journal. For anyone who is interested in wildflowers, earth friendly solutions for using native wildflowers for landscaping this article is a must read. In the article you will see and learn how to plant a meadow of wildflowers

Click Link Below for The Wall Street Journal Article

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303754904577530851855675044.html#articleTabs=article

Ion Exchange offers easy starter kits Click Link Below To Visit Our Website

http://ionxchange.com/

Ion Exchange Inc., A Native Seed & Plant Nursery Was Quoted In The Wall Street Journal

Howard Bright co-owner with his wife Donna of Ion Exchange, Inc. http://ionxchange.com/  was recently quoted in The Wall Street Journal. For anyone who is interested in wildflowers, earth friendly solutions for using native wildflowers for landscaping this article is a must read. In the article you will see and learn how to plant a meadow of wildflowers

Click Link Below for The Wall Street Journal Article

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303754904577530851855675044.html#articleTabs=article

Ion Exchange offers easy starter kits Click Link Below To Visit Our Website

http://ionxchange.com/

Monsanto Fails at Improving Agriculture Article

Monsanto Fails at Improving Agriculture

Help UCS Set the Record Straight by Sharing Our New Ad Campaign

Monsanto’s advertisements tell an impressive tale of the agribusiness giant’s achievements: Feeding a growing population. Protecting natural resources. Promoting biodiversity.

It sounds wonderful, but unfortunately, there’s a catch: These claims are often exaggerated, misleading or downright false. Monsanto’s products—and the practices they promote—may sustain the company’s profits, but the evidence shows that they stand in the way of truly sustainable solutions to our food and farming challenges.

In the ads below, we counter Monsanto’s feel-good rhetoric with some facts gleaned from UCS analysis. Share them with friends, and spread the word: when it comes to healthy farming, Monsanto fails!

(Click on the images to see full-size versions.)

#1: More Herbicide + Fewer Butterflies = Better Seeds?

Monsanto Says: “In the hands of farmers, better seeds can help meet the needs of our rapidly growing population, while protecting the earth’s natural resources.”

In Fact: Monsanto’s Roundup Ready crops, genetically engineered to tolerate the company’s Roundup herbicide,increased herbicide use by an estimated 383 million pounds between 1996 and 2008. And Monarch butterflies have laid 81 percent fewer eggs thanks to habitat loss since Roundup Ready was introduced.

#2: A Bumper Crop of Superweeds

Monsanto Says: “Our rapidly growing population is putting limited resources–such as land, water, and energy–under increased pressure.”

In Fact: The challenge is real, but Monsanto’s products aren’t the answer. UCS analysis shows that GE crops have so far done little to improve yields in the U.S. Meanwhile—speaking of rapidly growing populations—overuse of Roundup Ready crops has spawned an epidemic of “superweeds,” causing huge problems for U.S. farmers.

#3: All Wet on Drought Tolerance

Monsanto Says: “With the right tools, farmers can conserve more for future generations.”

In Fact: If farmers want to conserve more water, Monsanto’s DroughtGard corn isn’t the right tool. A recent UCS study found that DroughtGard won’t help farmers reduce water use—and its engineered drought tolerance will likely only be useful in moderate drought conditions. (Research has shown that organic farming methods could improve drought-year yields by up to 96%.)

Article Taken From Union Of Concerned Scientists Website

http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_agriculture/science_and_impacts/impacts_genetic_engineering/monsanto-fails-at-improving.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Earthyman views Midland Shooting Stars (Dodecatheon meadii) in bloom in at Eagle Valley Wisconsin

This prairie planting was planted by Ion Exchange, Inc several years ago and was in Full Bloom in May 2012

To Purchase Click on Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/DODECATHEON-MEADII-%7C-Midland-Shooting-Star.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Earthyman views Swamp Milkweed – Asclepias incarnata in full bloom in production field at Ion Exchange, Inc in NE Iowa. This is a prairie plant that is adaptable to many sites and attracts butterflies.

Swamp Milkweed provides beautiful Pink Blooms for your Prairie Garden.  It attracts many butterflies and will even grow in Swamps or well drained soil.  It Blooms the First Year the Plugs are planted and also Produces many seeds.

http://ionxchange.com/

To Purchase Click On Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/ASCLEPIAS-INCARNATA-%7C-Swamp-Milkweed.html