Tag Archives: Bees

Restoring The Landscape With Native Plants Tall Beard Tongue Insect Visitors

Article Written by noreply@blogger.com (Heather Holm) on Dec 07, 2012 03:16 pm

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Tall Beard Tongue ~ Penstemon digitalis
Beard tongue flowers have a large, hairy staminode on the lower half of the tubular flower which restricts access to bees to the flower and helps in pollen deposition. Small to medium sized bees are the most frequent visitors.

Tall Beard Tongue flowers can be white to light pink, sometimes with darker pink to purple stripes which act as nectar guides for bees.

Small Carpenter Bees (Ceratina spp) visit Tall Beard Tongue flowers primarily to feed on pollen. Their small size allows them to easily climb over the staminode into the tubular flowers to access the pollen on the anthers.

As they feed on pollen, they often inadvertently contact the stigma. The hairs on the staminode keep their bodies held closer to the stigma, resulting in more contact and pollen transfer.

Digger Bees (Anthophora spp.) are frequent visitors to Tall Beard Tongue flowers as well. They are fast moving and visit flowers for a very short time frame compared to Small Carpenter Bees.

Their medium sized bodies and long tongues allow them access into the tubular flower which results in abundant pollen removal as their bodies scrape on the anthers above.

Bumble Bees (Bombus spp.) are not primary pollinators of Tall Beard Tongue. Visiting the flowers for nectar, they are able to reach the nectar reward with their long tongues without having to insert their body into the corolla and come away with pollen on their bodies.

Look for small holes chewed at the base of the flower. Mason Wasps will chew holes to reach the nectar reward without having to enter the flower. Smaller bees will take advantage of these nectar thievery holes.

The Interaction between Pollinator Size and the Bristle Staminode of Penstemon digitalis (Scrophulariaceae) Gregg Dieringer and Leticia Cabrera R. American Journal of Botany , Vol. 89, No. 6 (Jun., 2002), pp. 991-997
© Heather Holm, 2012.

Article From Restoringthelandscape Website

To Purchase Tall Beard Tongue ~ Penstemon digitalis Visit Us At Ion Exchange, Inc.

 

Ion Exchange, Inc. Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants Website

Call 1-800-291-2143

 

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Plant Of The Week AGASTACHE SCROPHULARIAEFOLIA | Giant Purple Hyssop

Product Description

Giant Purple Hyssop (Agastache scrophulariae) – A great tall plant for the back of the perennial border. Tall spikey flowers attract butterflies, bees and hummingbirds. Prefers full sun and grows 3-4′ tall.

To Purchase This Native Wildflower Visit Us At http://ionxchange.com/products/AGASTACHE-SCROPHULARIAEFOLIA-%7C-Giant-Purple-Hyssop.html

Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants
Ion Exchange, Inc. http://ionxchange.com/
“helping you create your own natural beauty”
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Email:  Hbright@ionXchange.com

Earthyman’s Youtube Video of Wild Goldenglow (Rudbeckia lanciniata) at Ion Exchange, Inc.

Earthyman views Wild Goldenglow (Rudbeckia lanciniata) also known as Greenheaded Coneflower at Ion Exchange, native seed and plant nursery in NE Iowa. Wild Goldenglow is a great pollinator along your woodland edge.

To Purchase This Native Wildflower Visit Our Website at http://ionxchange.com/products/RUDBECKIA-LACINIATA-%7C-Wild-Golden-Glow.html

The Prairie Ecologist Sunflower Article

To Purchase Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants from Ion Exchange, Inc. Click On Our Link Below

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This is a Great Article from The Prairie Ecologist on Sunflowers Click Link Below

Prairie Ecologist Sunflower Party Time Article

 

Call Us at 1-800-291-2143 For any Questions You May Have Regarding Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants http://ionxchange.com/

 

 

The Great Sunflower Project Article On The BUZZ: Join Us for the Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11, 2012

The BUZZ: Join Us for the Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11!

Greetings citizen scientists! Our poll results are in, and, at last count, some 46% of you have sunflowers up and blooming. About one-third (34%) are still waiting for blooms (or encountered an gardening mishap), and another 21% didn’t plant sunflowers this year.

Those of you lucky enough to have sunflowers in bloom are diligently sending in your bee observations. Congratulations to all those who have already had the opportunity to observe, collect and report their data. Well done! Without your thoughtful observations, we would not have the wealth of information that we have to date.

To see results from the project using data reported up to 2012, have a look here: http://www.greatsunflower.org/results#map – you can zoom in on your area, see averages by type of garden and trends by year. Great stuff, and all because of your participation!

It’s important that you keep sending in data, so please join us and thousands of others across the country in The Great Bee Count on Saturday, August 11th.

Even if you do not have blooms on your sunflowers by August 11th, you can still be enjoy, learn and be part of the project by observing bees on other plants that you may have in bloom. Cosmos, tickseed, bee balm and echinacea, are all on our list, so you can collect data on these if your sunflowers are not blooming yet. And, it’s okay if your sunflower hasn’t bloomed yet. They will in time so you can make your 15 minute observation when they do open up.

And, this year, in support of the Great Bee Count, YourGardenShow.com will present a special online live broadcast “Double Feature” on August 11th, from 10am – noon EST (7am to 9am PST). First hour: a special “Ask Ian” Q&A show about pollination and pollinators followed by an hour of moderated interviews with bee experts talking about our pollinator friends. Join us for this one day event!: http://www.yourgardenshow.com/ask-ian

As you can see from our map, bees are declining in certain areas, and there are some areas where we have no data. Could that be your garden? The more we know, the more action will be able to be taken to preserve and enhance pollinator habitat.

Join us on August 11th!

Freddy B

To Purchase Pollinator Seed Mix Click on Ion Exchange, Inc. Link Below

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Pollinator Week Is June 18 – 24 2012 Ion Exchange, Inc. Purchase Your Pollinator Seed Mix Now

Pollinator Week is June 18th to 24th!
Plant a garden that butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees will love as much as you!

http://ionxchange.com/products/POLLINATOR-MIX.html

Product Description

POLLINATOR SEED MIX

 

SPECIES PLS/LB

Big Bluestem 6.53
Golden Alexanders 0.25
Blue Vervain 0.15
Alumroot 0.02
Black-eyed Susan 0.44
Common Mt. Mint 0.01
Common Spiderwort 0.17
Foxglove Beardtongue 0.02
Ironweed 0.12
Maryland Senna 0.80
Fragrant Coneflower 0.10
Great Bue Lobelia 0.01
Purple Prairie Clover 0.15
Hoary Vervain 0.10
Swamp Milkweed 0.29
9.16

Pollination by Native Bees

According to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, there are over 4000 species of native bees in the U.S. alone. Bees are the most predominant pollinators of flowering plants in nature, thus contributing a vital service to the ecosystem. Bees are referred to as “keystone organisms” because of this important role.

Some native bees have names that reflect how they build nests—leafcutter bees, mason bees, miner bees, carpenter bees, digger bees, etc.  Others are named for their behavior, which include bumble bees, sweat bees, and cuckoo bees. In addition, some bees are named for the types of plants they pollinate such as squash, sunflower and blueberry bees.

When honey bees are in short supply, the pollination needs of many crops can be filled by native bees. Research reflects that native bees can be major pollinators of agricultural crops and sometimes do the job more efficiently. For instance, the blue orchard bee is a primary pollinator of cultivated apples. Another important crop pollinator is the western bumble bee, which has been used to pollinate cranberries, avocadoes, and blueberries. Native squash bees are major pollinators of cultivated squashes. Some native bees are even commercially managed like honey bees to provide pollination services.   Great news for Iowa native plants and pollinators!

 

CRP Wildlife Food Plots

CRP wildlife food plot options now allow a food plot consisting of all native grasses and forbs.  Unlike traditional grain food plots, now additional pollen and nectar will be available.  Futhermore, a native food plot will not be disked and replanted every year or every other year like the alternative grain food plots. Thus, bees utilizing ground burrows will benefit!

http://ionxchange.com

 

Pollinator Week Is June 18 – 24 2012 Ion Exchange, Inc. Purchase Your Pollinator Plant Kit Now

Pollinator Week is June 18th to 24th!
Plant a garden that butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees

will love as much as you!

http://ionxchange.com/products/POLLINATOR-PLANT-KIT.html

Product Description

Take steps to help our pollinator populations thrive. By supporting pollinators’ need for habitat, we support our own needs for food and support diversity in the natural world.

This beautiful native Pollinator Plant Kit will not only provide color throughout the seasons but will also benefit bees, hummingbirds and butterflies.  It consists of 84 plants; 7 each of the following species:

  • Monarda fistulosa (Wild Bergamot)
  • Solidago speciosa (Showy Goldenrod)
  • Tradescantia ohiensis (Ohio Spiderwort)
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
  • Pycnanthemum virginianum (Mt. Mint)
  • Aster novae-angliae (New England Aster)
  • Liatris pycnostachya (Prairie Blazingstar)
  • Liatris liguilistylis (Meadow Blazingstar)
  • Penstemon digitalis (Foxglove Beardtongue)
  • Lobelia siphilitica (Great Blue Lobelia)
  • Eupatorium maculatum (Joe-pye Weed)
  • Aquilegia canadensis (Columbine)

Special Bonuses are Included:

(1) Pollinator App. and

(2) Downloadable Pollinator Guide

“Farming feeds the world, and we must remember that pollinators are a critical link to our food system” –  Paul Growald, Co-Founder, Pollinator Partnership

Did you know that domestic honey bees pollinate approximately $10 billion worth of crops in the U.S. each year?

Both native pollinators and domesticated bee populations are declining and are threatened by habitat loss, disease, and excessive and/or inappropriate use of pesticides.

Commercial bees lost to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) highlights how
severe the issues of proper hive management are to reduce stresses caused
by disease, pesticide use, insufficient nutrition, and transportation practices.

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