Tag Archives: Food

Monsanto Fails at Improving Agriculture Article

Monsanto Fails at Improving Agriculture

Help UCS Set the Record Straight by Sharing Our New Ad Campaign

Monsanto’s advertisements tell an impressive tale of the agribusiness giant’s achievements: Feeding a growing population. Protecting natural resources. Promoting biodiversity.

It sounds wonderful, but unfortunately, there’s a catch: These claims are often exaggerated, misleading or downright false. Monsanto’s products—and the practices they promote—may sustain the company’s profits, but the evidence shows that they stand in the way of truly sustainable solutions to our food and farming challenges.

In the ads below, we counter Monsanto’s feel-good rhetoric with some facts gleaned from UCS analysis. Share them with friends, and spread the word: when it comes to healthy farming, Monsanto fails!

(Click on the images to see full-size versions.)

#1: More Herbicide + Fewer Butterflies = Better Seeds?

Monsanto Says: “In the hands of farmers, better seeds can help meet the needs of our rapidly growing population, while protecting the earth’s natural resources.”

In Fact: Monsanto’s Roundup Ready crops, genetically engineered to tolerate the company’s Roundup herbicide,increased herbicide use by an estimated 383 million pounds between 1996 and 2008. And Monarch butterflies have laid 81 percent fewer eggs thanks to habitat loss since Roundup Ready was introduced.

#2: A Bumper Crop of Superweeds

Monsanto Says: “Our rapidly growing population is putting limited resources–such as land, water, and energy–under increased pressure.”

In Fact: The challenge is real, but Monsanto’s products aren’t the answer. UCS analysis shows that GE crops have so far done little to improve yields in the U.S. Meanwhile—speaking of rapidly growing populations—overuse of Roundup Ready crops has spawned an epidemic of “superweeds,” causing huge problems for U.S. farmers.

#3: All Wet on Drought Tolerance

Monsanto Says: “With the right tools, farmers can conserve more for future generations.”

In Fact: If farmers want to conserve more water, Monsanto’s DroughtGard corn isn’t the right tool. A recent UCS study found that DroughtGard won’t help farmers reduce water use—and its engineered drought tolerance will likely only be useful in moderate drought conditions. (Research has shown that organic farming methods could improve drought-year yields by up to 96%.)

Article Taken From Union Of Concerned Scientists Website

http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_agriculture/science_and_impacts/impacts_genetic_engineering/monsanto-fails-at-improving.html

http://ionxchange.com/

Advertisements

Pollinator Week Is June 18 – 24 2012 Ion Exchange, Inc. Purchase Your Pollinator Plant Kit Now

Pollinator Week is June 18th to 24th!
Plant a garden that butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees

will love as much as you!

http://ionxchange.com/products/POLLINATOR-PLANT-KIT.html

Product Description

Take steps to help our pollinator populations thrive. By supporting pollinators’ need for habitat, we support our own needs for food and support diversity in the natural world.

This beautiful native Pollinator Plant Kit will not only provide color throughout the seasons but will also benefit bees, hummingbirds and butterflies.  It consists of 84 plants; 7 each of the following species:

  • Monarda fistulosa (Wild Bergamot)
  • Solidago speciosa (Showy Goldenrod)
  • Tradescantia ohiensis (Ohio Spiderwort)
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
  • Pycnanthemum virginianum (Mt. Mint)
  • Aster novae-angliae (New England Aster)
  • Liatris pycnostachya (Prairie Blazingstar)
  • Liatris liguilistylis (Meadow Blazingstar)
  • Penstemon digitalis (Foxglove Beardtongue)
  • Lobelia siphilitica (Great Blue Lobelia)
  • Eupatorium maculatum (Joe-pye Weed)
  • Aquilegia canadensis (Columbine)

Special Bonuses are Included:

(1) Pollinator App. and

(2) Downloadable Pollinator Guide

“Farming feeds the world, and we must remember that pollinators are a critical link to our food system” –  Paul Growald, Co-Founder, Pollinator Partnership

Did you know that domestic honey bees pollinate approximately $10 billion worth of crops in the U.S. each year?

Both native pollinators and domesticated bee populations are declining and are threatened by habitat loss, disease, and excessive and/or inappropriate use of pesticides.

Commercial bees lost to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) highlights how
severe the issues of proper hive management are to reduce stresses caused
by disease, pesticide use, insufficient nutrition, and transportation practices.

http://ionxchange.com