Tag Archives: Native plant

Cup Plant – Silphium perfoliatum

Cup Plant Silphum perforliatum available at Ion Exchange

Cup Plant - Silphium perforliatum

 

 

Compass Plant, Rosinweed (also refers to S. integrifolium), Turpentine Plant, Polar Plant”

Silphium is an ancient Greek term for “resinous juices”. Perfoliatum is from the Latin for “with the leaf surrounding the stem so the stem appears to pass through the leaf”.

Sun Exposure               Prairie, Savanna
Soil Moisture Wet Mesic, Mesic
Bloom Time Summer, Fall                       July, August, September
Bloom Color Yellow
Max Height 8 feet
Wetland Code FACW-
Germ Code  C(60)
Seeds Per Ounce  1,400

Found throughout the tallgrass Prairie region and south on mesic prairies. Bright yellow flowers bloom from July through August. Very tall plant, sometimes reaching 8 or more feet. The taproot is also very long, reaching as much as 4 to 5 feet into the ground. The distinctive joined leaves form a cup that can actually hold water after a rain. Many’s the time we have seen finches and sparrows bathing in the cup on a hot summer day.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Cup plant was employed medicinally by several native North American Indian tribes who used it to treat a variety of complaints. It is little, if at all, used in modern herbalism. A decoction of the root has been used to treat the stoppage of periods, and also to treat morning sickness and to prevent the premature birth of a child. In view of these conflicting uses, it is best that it is not used by pregnant women unless under the guidance of a qualified practitioner. The root is alterative, antispasmodic, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, stimulant, styptic and tonic. It is used in the treatment of liver and spleen disorders and has also been used to treat morning sickness. A decoction of the root has been used internally in the treatment of back and chest pain and lung haemorrhages. A decoction of the root has been used as a face wash to treat paralysis. A poultice of the moistened dried root has been applied to wounds to stop the bleeding.

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To learn more visit Ion Exchange – A Native Seed and Plant Nursery
Advertisements

Growing Native Wildflowers in a Pot

Wendy shares about her native prairie perennial plant Leadplant (Amorpha canescens) growing in a pot in her urban garden. Watch this short video at  http://youtu.be/jXNtOB2CC4k

This Memorial Day Honor Those Who Have Served You!

Memorial Day | Memorial Day Garden

Honor our Loved Ones With A Memorial Day Garden

Create an Everlasting Memorial Garden for those loved, lost and always remembered….

Here are just a few choices to start you off:

Dry Site Mix

The Dry Site/Short Prairie Seed Mix 

The Dry Site | Short Prairie Seed Mix is

a mixture of specially selected wildflowers

and grasses that are adapted to dry soils

with full sunlight exposure. This seed mix

is great for soils that are sandy, rocky, clay

or just too poor to grow most plants. This mix is filled with species that will thrive under the worst conditions.

Showy Native Wildflower Mix

Showy Wildflower Mix

Showy Wildflower Mix 

These species have been selected to give you showy blooms throughout the growing season from spring through fall. This mix has 30%
more wildflower seed in it than our standard mixes. A great value for those who want more wildflowers in their mix.
This mix is adapted to well drained soils with medium to medium dry conditions.

Waters Edge Package

Water’s Edge Beautification Package 

Great for Water Gardens, Ponds, Lakes, Creek beds, Streams, wetlands and any other water edge. Can be planted anytime throughout the summer. The plants will develop quickly. The native wildflowers included in the mix attract birds, hummingbirds and butterflies while providing vibrant colors of purple, red and
yellow throughout the growing seasons.

Native Prairie Cemetery Brings Back Memories

This was a great article about the Rochester Cemetery http://www.desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2011104240302.  It reminded me of my first years in Iowa.  In 1970, I was a Soil Scientist working for the Soil Conservation Service.  Little did I know that I would be mapping the soils of Rochester Cemetery.  I was mesmerized by the diversity of plants and the feeling that I got as I walked over this special place.  Still, I remember eating my bologna and cheese and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches over the noon hour and just sitting there being overwhelmed as the spirits of the past meshed with the earth and her special treasures adorning the gravesites.  This is where I learned to sense the vibrations of Iowa native plants and how different the feel was there in that cemetery compared to the feelings I got while traversing acres and acres of corn and soybean fields.

Howard Bright
President
Ion Exchange Native Seed and Plant Nursery 

Meadow Blazingstar

Add this native perennial plant to  attract butterflies into your garden with the beautiful native plant “Meadow Blazingstar“.  For more information click here

Perennial Native Plant Meadow Blazingstar

Meadow Blazingstar

Order Your Native Bare Root Plants Now

Ion Exchange bare root plants Get your order for your native wildflower or native grass bare root plants now while there are many to choose from.  It is easy to order right from Ion Exchange Inc. or call 800-291-2143.

Using Native Planting to Encourage Wildlife

By Geoff Wakeling Platinum Quality Author

If you are planning on creating a wildlife garden, one of the best planting options is to include native species. At the very least you should attempt to include a range of ornamental strains developed from native specimens. Plants which are naturally growing in a region will often thrive in gardens as they are already adapted to the environment in which they are growing. This therefore means that they require less work to maintain, in addition to providing insects, birds, mammals and other creatures with a natural transition from wild habitat to carefully managed garden.

There a number of ways for including native planting in your garden depending on the space that you aspire to have. If you don’t mind having a slightly wild area, let nature take its course and as plants self seed themselves allow them to grow. This could be a small area of meadow which is allowed to thrive, a patch of nettles in a corner, or the sporadic growing of plants throughout a border. Plants such as borridge and forget-me-nots can look very pretty before going over, and can fit into a border quite well. Weeds are all in a gardeners perception, and are simply plants which have grown, in your mind, in the wrong place. Allowing the odd ‘weed’ to grow can be beneficial for wildlife, especially insects that will naturally be drawn to native plants that they visit every day. Leaving a wild patch of native planting is ideally the best way to encourage wildlife into your garden, and if you have room it is the best option.

If you prefer to garden through a more maintained method and do not want to incorporate a wild patch of naturally growing vegetation in your garden, the best option is to try and include ornamental varieties of wild plants. In some cases this can actually be more beneficial to wildlife, with some propagated specimens having larger flowers and more nectar for creatures to feast upon. All plants have fundamentally been bred from naturally occurring specimens, so finding species native to your area should not be hard. Foxgloves, ornamental nettles, roses, and thornless blackberries are all examples of plants which have been developed into ornamental plants and are commonly used in gardens around the world even though some may look far removed from their native counterparts. However, their use in wildlife gardens will provide the ideal transition as creatures move from a natural habitat to a managed one. Meanwhile, by utilising plants which are native to your area, you can help ensure that gardens will thrive in their environment, taking less time to maintain, and providing wildlife with a welcome home from home.

If you want to learn more about becoming a green fingered horticulturist and enjoying your own garden and allotment head over to http://www.theguidetogaygardening.com for more information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Geoff_Wakeling