Tag Archives: Perennial plant

Perennial Plant of the Week – Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomans Seal

 

Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomon’s Seal


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Product Description
“Solomon’s Seal, Conquer John, Sealwort”

Polygonatum comes from the Greek word meaning “with many knees”. This is most likely in reference to the bulbous, jointed rhizomes. Canaliculatum comes from the Latin for “channeled” or “with a long groove”. Some botanists and taxonomists divide this particular plant into three different species – P. canaliculatum, P. biflora and P. communtatum. The differences are difficult to tell without magnification..

The common name, Solomon’s seal derives from its rootstock that bears flat round scars which resemble the impression of a seal. Biblical King Solomon’s famous seal was a magical signet ring. A transverse cut on the root was once believed to reveal Hebrew characters left by King Solomon’s seal.

Since each year of growth leaves a new “seal” on the rhizome, you can estimate the age of a Solomon’s seal plant by counting the scars.

Even though the stems can easily reach 6 feet in length, the plant itself is generally 3 feet or less in height with the stems making long, sweeping arches. It’s found on rich woodland soils and occasionally in the open areas of cleared woodlands. It prefers cool moist soil but tolerates dry or damp once established. Green-white to white flowers bloom beneath the leaves from May through June. It is a rugged, deer resistant plant largely unbothered by disease.

The roots, berries and young shoots were once used a sources for food. The Iroquois actually cultivated Solomon’s Seal to use the roots for a dietary staple. The Chippewa believed ingesting the roots would aid in curing back pain and/or kidney problems. In order to achieve its full effect, they believed the medicinal rootstock needed to be saved in a pouch made of bear’s paws. The Meskwaki and Potawatami would place a small piece of root on burning coals to create fumes that could revive one from an unconcsious state. Early settlers used preparations of the root to treat hemorrhoids, arthritis, poison ivy, skin rashes and eczema. They also beleived that an extract from the root of P. canaliculatum would make freckles disappear or diminish.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To Purchase Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomans Seal Click Here

To Purchase All Your Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants Visit Us At Our Website Native Wildflowers & Seeds from Ion Exchange, Inc.

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Wildflower of The Week: Panicum Virgatum | Switchgrass Gardening Gone Wild Website Has Name This One a Top Perennial Plant for 2013!

Wildflower of The Week: Panicum Virgatum | Switchgrass Gardening Gone Wild Website Has Named This One a Top Perennial Plant for 2013!

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Product Description:

(PLS) This native perennial grass is 3-6′ tall and more or less erect; it usually grows in large bunches. The culms are light to medium green, terete, glabrous, and fairly stout; each culm has several alternate leaves that span most of its length underneath the inflorescence. The leaf blades are up to 2/3″ (15 mm.) across and 2′ long; they are usually medium green (less often blue and glaucous), hairless or mostly hairless, and ascending to widely spreading. The leaf sheaths are about the same color as the blades and hairless; they are open at the mouth. Each ligule has a band of white hairs, while the nodes are swollen and often dark-colored.
“The culm terminates in an inflorescence about 8-20″” long and half as much across. This inflorescence is an airy panicle of spikelets; is broader toward the bottom than the top (pyramidal or conical). The slender branches of the panicle are ascending to spreading and fairly straight. Each branch terminates in a small spikelet about 4-5 mm. long that is ellipsoid or narrowly ovoid in shape. The spikelets are initially light reddish purple, but they later become light tan. Each spikelet has a pair of glumes, a single fertile lemma, and a floret. The first glume is about two-thirds the length of the spikelet, while the remaining glume and lemma are the same length as the spikelet. The first glume gradually tapers to a long tip. The blooming period occurs during mid-summer. Pollination of the florets is by wind. The floret of each spikelet is replaced by a grain that is 2-3 mm. long; this grain is ovoid-oblong in shape and somewhat flattened on one side. The root system is fibrous and rhizomatous; the fibrous roots can penetrate more than 10 ft. in the ground. Reproduction is by seed and vegetatively through rhizomes.

“The preference is partial to full sunlight, moist to mesic conditions, and deep fertile soil. However, this robust grass can tolerate practically any kind of soil and it will adapt to drier conditions. This grass can spread aggressively, therefore it should not be overplanted.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To Purchase Panicum Virgatum | Switchgrass Visit our Website at Native Wildflowers & Seeds from Ion Exchange, Inc.

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Website

563-535-7231

Cup Plant – Silphium perfoliatum

Cup Plant Silphum perforliatum available at Ion Exchange

Cup Plant - Silphium perforliatum

 

 

Compass Plant, Rosinweed (also refers to S. integrifolium), Turpentine Plant, Polar Plant”

Silphium is an ancient Greek term for “resinous juices”. Perfoliatum is from the Latin for “with the leaf surrounding the stem so the stem appears to pass through the leaf”.

Sun Exposure               Prairie, Savanna
Soil Moisture Wet Mesic, Mesic
Bloom Time Summer, Fall                       July, August, September
Bloom Color Yellow
Max Height 8 feet
Wetland Code FACW-
Germ Code  C(60)
Seeds Per Ounce  1,400

Found throughout the tallgrass Prairie region and south on mesic prairies. Bright yellow flowers bloom from July through August. Very tall plant, sometimes reaching 8 or more feet. The taproot is also very long, reaching as much as 4 to 5 feet into the ground. The distinctive joined leaves form a cup that can actually hold water after a rain. Many’s the time we have seen finches and sparrows bathing in the cup on a hot summer day.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Cup plant was employed medicinally by several native North American Indian tribes who used it to treat a variety of complaints. It is little, if at all, used in modern herbalism. A decoction of the root has been used to treat the stoppage of periods, and also to treat morning sickness and to prevent the premature birth of a child. In view of these conflicting uses, it is best that it is not used by pregnant women unless under the guidance of a qualified practitioner. The root is alterative, antispasmodic, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, stimulant, styptic and tonic. It is used in the treatment of liver and spleen disorders and has also been used to treat morning sickness. A decoction of the root has been used internally in the treatment of back and chest pain and lung haemorrhages. A decoction of the root has been used as a face wash to treat paralysis. A poultice of the moistened dried root has been applied to wounds to stop the bleeding.

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To learn more visit Ion Exchange – A Native Seed and Plant Nursery

Growing Native Wildflowers in a Pot

Wendy shares about her native prairie perennial plant Leadplant (Amorpha canescens) growing in a pot in her urban garden. Watch this short video at  http://youtu.be/jXNtOB2CC4k

Wildflower of the Week – Oxeye Sunflower -Heliopsis helianthoides

Oxeye Sunflower, False Sunflower”

Heliopsis from the Greek word helios for “sun” and opsis for “appearance”. Helianthoides also from the Greek meaning “like Helianthus”, the sunflower. Found throughout the Tallgrass Prairie region and in other open prairie areas, especially on dry soils. Also does quite well in disturbed areas and dry woods. Blooms from June to October. Can grow to 5 feet tall with stem branched toward the top of the plant. Arrowhead-shaped leaves are opposite on the stem and can be 6 inches long. Stem may be topped by a single light yellow flower or branched into a head of many flowers. No medicinal or food uses reported but it has been used widely as an ornamental in gardens.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

Native wildflower Ox-eye Sunflower Heliopsis helianthoides

Oxeye Sunflower

Ion Exchange – A Native Seed and Plant Nursery

Wildflower of the Week – Monarda fistulosa – Wild Bergomot

MONARDA FISTULOSA | Wild Bergomot  - Perennial Wildflower Lavender colored blooms July through September.

MONARDA FISTULOSA | Wild Bergomot

 Wild Bergamot also known as Horsemint & Bee Balm.
Monarda named in honor of Spanish botanist,
Nicolas Monardes, who wrote extensively in the
16th century about medicinal and useful plants.
Fistulosa from the Latin for "like a reed or
a pipe" referring to the individual flowers.
Common to the eastern and northeastern US and
the central Tallgrass region on rich, moist
soils. Found along the edges of woods, roadsides
and old pastures. Pink to light purple
flowers from July to September. Can grow to 5
feet. Typical square stem of the mint family.
Native Americans used a tea made from the
leaves of Wild Bergamot to treat colic,
flatulence, colds, fevers, stomachaches,
nosebleeds, insomnia, heart trouble
and to induce sweating in measles. Apoultice
made from the leaves was used to treat headaches.
Physicians once used the same leaf tea to expel worms and gas.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Wild bergamot was often employed
medicinally by several native North
American Indian tribes who used it to treat
a variety of complaints, but especially
those connected with the digestive system.
It is still sometimes used in modern herbalism.
The leaves and flowering stems are carminative,
diaphoretic, diuretic and stimulant.
An infusion is used internally in the treatment
of colds, catarrh, headaches, gastric disorders,
aching kidneys, to reduce low fevers and soothe
sore throats. Externally,
it is applied as a poultice to skin eruptions,
cuts etc and as a wash for sore eyes. The
leaves can be harvested before the plant flowers,
or they can be harvested with the flowering stems.
They can be used fresh or dried. The plant contains
the essential oil 'bergamot oil' which can be
inhaled to treat bronchial complaints.The leaves
also contain 'thymol', an essential oil that can be used
to expel gas from the digestive tract.

Other Uses: The leaves have been used as an insect repellent.

Herbal Uses: Unknown

http://ionxchange.com/products/MONARDA-FISTULOSA-%7C-Wild-Bergomot.html

Cup Plant – Silphium perfoliatum at Ion Exchange

Earthyman films Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum) growing at Ion Exchange in NE Iowa. http://www.ionxchange.com Bright yellow flowers bloom in July/August.