Tag Archives: Species

Article On Whats in Bloom: Silphiums for fall (native prairie plants), tough species that need little water | Max’s Greener Places

Whats in Bloom: Silphiums for fall (native prairie plants), tough species that need little water

‘Drought tolerant’. That is the description we all want to hear, and will most certainly need to hear as time goes by and water becomes increasingly expensive, and perhaps scarce in some regions. Four silphiums make up the family : Compass plant, cup plant, rosin weed, and prairie dock all present bright sulphur yellow blooms, and large tough leaves.

Max’s Greener Places

To Purchase Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants Visit Us At http://ionxchange.com/

Advertisements

Pollinator Week Is June 18 – 24 2012 Ion Exchange, Inc. Purchase Your Pollinator Plant Kit Now

Pollinator Week is June 18th to 24th!
Plant a garden that butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees

will love as much as you!

http://ionxchange.com/products/POLLINATOR-PLANT-KIT.html

Product Description

Take steps to help our pollinator populations thrive. By supporting pollinators’ need for habitat, we support our own needs for food and support diversity in the natural world.

This beautiful native Pollinator Plant Kit will not only provide color throughout the seasons but will also benefit bees, hummingbirds and butterflies.  It consists of 84 plants; 7 each of the following species:

  • Monarda fistulosa (Wild Bergamot)
  • Solidago speciosa (Showy Goldenrod)
  • Tradescantia ohiensis (Ohio Spiderwort)
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
  • Pycnanthemum virginianum (Mt. Mint)
  • Aster novae-angliae (New England Aster)
  • Liatris pycnostachya (Prairie Blazingstar)
  • Liatris liguilistylis (Meadow Blazingstar)
  • Penstemon digitalis (Foxglove Beardtongue)
  • Lobelia siphilitica (Great Blue Lobelia)
  • Eupatorium maculatum (Joe-pye Weed)
  • Aquilegia canadensis (Columbine)

Special Bonuses are Included:

(1) Pollinator App. and

(2) Downloadable Pollinator Guide

“Farming feeds the world, and we must remember that pollinators are a critical link to our food system” –  Paul Growald, Co-Founder, Pollinator Partnership

Did you know that domestic honey bees pollinate approximately $10 billion worth of crops in the U.S. each year?

Both native pollinators and domesticated bee populations are declining and are threatened by habitat loss, disease, and excessive and/or inappropriate use of pesticides.

Commercial bees lost to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) highlights how
severe the issues of proper hive management are to reduce stresses caused
by disease, pesticide use, insufficient nutrition, and transportation practices.

http://ionxchange.com

My Little Prairie

My Little Prairie

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


After a thunderstorm and lots of rain last night, I walked out to our 1-mile labyrinth through our 20-year-old prairie.  I noticed the mist rising through the thick morning air and smelled the freshness of the ground and air.  Dew dripped from the Big Bluestem.  Showy Tick-trefoil was seen drooping its purple head now standing 4 feet high towering over the already bloomed Golden Alexanders.

Still the Ohio Spiderwort sends out a spectacular 3 petaled blue flower saying goodbye once again to its blooming season.

The Yellow Coneflowers reach skyward with blooms in the green buds ready to burst into their summer yellow suits supporting their cone heads.

Mad Dog Skullcap sported its pink and white blooms and stood at attention just below the ever-growing Indian Grass.

Cup Plant had reached the overflow mark as its’ cupped leaves held at least 4 ozs. of water after the rain.  It continues its upward growth trying to once again outdo itself having reached over 7 feet in height last year.

A closer look revealed a Cream Gentian trying to get attention but alas all it could show were its waxy leaves waiting for another month to bloom and show off its pale yellow color.  Of course the Butterfly Milkweed needs no search to find as it shows forth its psychedelic orange heads stealing all the attention to itself.

The prairie hides many treasures just waiting to surprise the passerby with its individual personality made up of a hundred species of native flowers and grasses forming a living community adapted to the seasons of time.  A virtual kaleidoscope of dazzling colors turning off and on as the seasons roll by, is there to just enjoy.  Each species alone can be cherished but we sometimes forget that they all joined hands at one time making one of the largest living communities in the world sweeping from Texas to Canada.

Purple Coneflower, Oxeye Sunflower, Wild Indigo

Enhanced by Zemanta

Benefits of Planting Live Wildflower & Grass Plant Plugs

The plugs in the 84 Nova trays measure 1 1/8 inch diameter by 2 7/8 inches deep and taper like a cone with a bottom drain opening. The interior ridged design of the plug directs root growth downward & avoids the wrap around growth allowed by smooth sided plugs. As the roots develop & escape through the drain opening of the plug the atmosphere will burn off the protruding root material, in effect pruning them to encourage constant development of fresh root growth. When the plugs are placed into the ground, the roots are ready to rapidly establish themselves down into the soil. It has been our experience with planting both 3” square pots & the 84 Nova plugs that the plugs will compete with & sometimes surpass the growth of the larger potted plants in the first growing season. Some species planted as plugs will flower & set seed in the first year-we had Sawtooth sunflowers that were planted in June reach nearly 8’ & flower in the same season. The size of these 84 Nova plugs makes them easy to handle in planting & transporting. Native Plant Plug

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Plant Native Plant Plugs Now

Follow these simple steps to get your native garden going with live plant plugs:  Select the proper species just right for your region and environment. Select color, bloom time, soil moisture required and sunlight conditions.  Eliminate all competition from existing vegetation by tillage or using a burn down herbicide such as Roundup.  Group your plants by species and plant in clusters to make sure you get a real burst of color during flowering time.  Space your plants approximately one foot on center but you may leave a greater distance between clusters.  Of course, plant taller species in the background so as to not to hide shorter species.  Use a dibble bar to plant your plugs. A dibble bar can be hand made. If you are in loose soil that has been tilled, you may use your hand or hand trowel but in harder untilled soil, you will need a planting device called a dibble bar that you can create or purchase.  Make sure your live plants, when planted have good soil contact with minimal air space around roots. Insure this by heeling in the plants without injuring them and water them right away.  Mulch the entire area with approximately 4 inches of mulch.  You will need to maintain your garden by eliminating any unwanted weeds or species that tend to spread.  You may want to move some of your species in the future because you do not like the aesthetics. You can paint your own picture after you get a feel for what looks good to you. Earthyman

www.ionxchange.com hbright@acegroup.cc

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]