Tag Archives: Yellow Flowers

Featured Plant of the Week: OENOTHERA PILOSELLA | Prairie Sundrops

OENOTHERA PILOSELLA | Prairie Sundrops

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Product Description: Prairie Sundrops are bushy plants that have flower clusters or hairy buds atop hairy stems. Flowers are bright yellow, 2″ wide and have four large petals, large showy stamens, and fine white or transparent lines that radiate outward from the center of the flower.

Sun Exposure: Prairie, Savanna; Soil Moisture: Wet Mesic, Dry Mesic; Bloom Time: Summer, Fall; Bloom Color: Yellow; Max Height: 2 Feet.

To Purchase OENOTHERA PILOSELLA | Prairie Sundrops Please Visit Our Website At Native Wildflowers & Seeds from Ion Exchange, Inc.

Perennial Plant of the Week – Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomans Seal

 

Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomon’s Seal


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Product Description
“Solomon’s Seal, Conquer John, Sealwort”

Polygonatum comes from the Greek word meaning “with many knees”. This is most likely in reference to the bulbous, jointed rhizomes. Canaliculatum comes from the Latin for “channeled” or “with a long groove”. Some botanists and taxonomists divide this particular plant into three different species – P. canaliculatum, P. biflora and P. communtatum. The differences are difficult to tell without magnification..

The common name, Solomon’s seal derives from its rootstock that bears flat round scars which resemble the impression of a seal. Biblical King Solomon’s famous seal was a magical signet ring. A transverse cut on the root was once believed to reveal Hebrew characters left by King Solomon’s seal.

Since each year of growth leaves a new “seal” on the rhizome, you can estimate the age of a Solomon’s seal plant by counting the scars.

Even though the stems can easily reach 6 feet in length, the plant itself is generally 3 feet or less in height with the stems making long, sweeping arches. It’s found on rich woodland soils and occasionally in the open areas of cleared woodlands. It prefers cool moist soil but tolerates dry or damp once established. Green-white to white flowers bloom beneath the leaves from May through June. It is a rugged, deer resistant plant largely unbothered by disease.

The roots, berries and young shoots were once used a sources for food. The Iroquois actually cultivated Solomon’s Seal to use the roots for a dietary staple. The Chippewa believed ingesting the roots would aid in curing back pain and/or kidney problems. In order to achieve its full effect, they believed the medicinal rootstock needed to be saved in a pouch made of bear’s paws. The Meskwaki and Potawatami would place a small piece of root on burning coals to create fumes that could revive one from an unconcsious state. Early settlers used preparations of the root to treat hemorrhoids, arthritis, poison ivy, skin rashes and eczema. They also beleived that an extract from the root of P. canaliculatum would make freckles disappear or diminish.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Uses: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To Purchase Polygonatum Canaliculatum | Solomans Seal Click Here

To Purchase All Your Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants Visit Us At Our Website Native Wildflowers & Seeds from Ion Exchange, Inc.

Plant Of The Week Actinomeris Alterifolia | Wingstem From Ion Exchange, Inc.

Product Description
Wingstem (Actinomeris Alternifolia) may be considered a weed when found growing along roads. Yellow, daisy-like flowers; alternating leaves flowing into “wings” on the stem; grows 3 to 8 feet and is found in woodland edges and thickets From Iowa to southern Ontario, and New York south.

Asteraceae Family – “Wingstem”

Blooms from August through the end of September. It is the only Actinomeris species in our area. Finding it in a wooded hollow in late summer is a surprise of color. It is a good indicator that the soil is alluvial.

To Purchase This Native Wildflower Visit Us At Our Ion Exchange, Inc. Website At http://ionxchange.com/products/ACTINOMERIS-ALTERIFOLIA-%7C-Wingstem.html

Or Visit Us At Our Native Wildflowers & Seeds Website At
Native Wildflowers & Prairie Plants http://nativewildflowersandseeds.com/actinomeris-alterifolia-wingstem/

“helping you create your own natural beauty”

Hbright@IonXchange.com
1-800-291-2143

Ratibida Pinnata : Yellow Coneflower

Product Description:
“Drooping Coneflower, Gray Coneflower, Prairie Coneflower (also applied to R. columnifera), Weary Susan, Grayheaded Coneflower”

Origin of the name Ratibida is not known. Pinnata comes from the Latin word meaning “featherlike

Sun Exposer: Prairie, Savanna
Soil Moisture: Mesic, Dry Mesic
Bloom Time: Summer, Fall (July, August, September)
Bloom Color: Yellow
Max Height: 5 Feet
Wetland Code: UPL
Germ Code: C(30)
Seeds Per Ounce: 30,000

Found throughout the Tallgrass Prairie region and extensively elsewhere. Prefers dry areas, roadsides, along old railroad right-of-ways. Root system is a very stout, sturdy rhizome. One or several yellow flowers may top a single stem. Grows tall and erect to about 4 feet. Grows easily from seed and is often found as a sturdy and plentiful survivor on former prairies where nearly all of the original plants have disappeared.

Native Americans made a refreshing tea from the cones and leaves of yellow coneflower. The Meskwaki used the root as an ingredient to cure toothaches.

Edible Uses: Unknown

Medicinal Usse: Unknown

Herbal Uses: Unknown

To Purchase This Native Wildflower Click on Ion Exchange, Inc., Link Below

http://ionxchange.com/products/RATIBIDA-PINNATA-%7C-Yellow-Coneflower.html